a unique perspective on this crazy world

Posts tagged ‘rockwell hotel’

solo adventures

I am not averse to travelling with companions but, once you reach a certain age, it can be tough to get people to commit due to their various entanglements with other people so I started travelling solo.  It was also a personal challenge since genetically I am painfully shy but have been training myself for so long now to be bolder and not let my natural personality curtail the opportunities life might present me that people laugh in my face when I suggest that I am an introvert, let alone painfully shy.  I’ve learned to just smile and wear it as a badge of honour.  On a good night, I can even “work a room” now, which still continues to amaze me.  I just feel grateful that I learned at a young age that it was NECESSARY to learn how to talk to strangers, even if it made me want to throw up from nerves when I first began the experiment.

gritty east london

exploring shoreditch

I would highly recommend getting comfortable with talking to strangers.  You will get plenty of opportunity if you stay at the Hoxton and hang out at the bar. It was a while ago so I can’t remember everyone I met but do remember it as a friendly place.  I had a couple of memorable encounters.  One night I met an Iranian immigrant on his way to Australia.  He was somewhat besotted with me despite an age difference that was ridiculous and he was dragged off by his friends to another venue.  I think part of the attraction may have been that I knew a bit about Iran and told him one of my best friends is married to a Persian.  I also have lived in Australia so bonding was easy.

More bizarre was my Sunday night adventure.  I didn’t expect much to be happening on Sunday night but, when you are a tourist travelling alone, your room is a bit boring so was sitting in the lobby area working on the blog when some locals spotted me.  It’s always nice to meet people from the actual ‘hood in which you are temporarily domiciled and these ladies were real EastEnders, born in the neighborhood before the more recent gentrification.

Apparently the Hoxton offers membership and discounts to locals to encourage them to hang out, especially on days when tourists may be sparse.  While you may not meet many people on Sunday night, it is also likely the people there will bond more easily.  With very little effort, my blog prep efforts were abandoned and I became part of an intriguing quasi safari observing human behaviour rather than animal 🙂

The women were old friends and very chatty.  At first, everything was pretty normal.  Where things got interesting was when it changed from chit chat about how the neighborhood had changed to being a participant in a cougar safari adventure.  I can’t remember now how the young guys got involved but they seemed happy to buy everyone drinks and flirt. One of the lads was handsome and exceptionally charming.  The other two women lapped up the attention.  It was like watching soap opera live.  After a while, the young men took off and I figured the entertainment was over but then one of the women also left.  The other lady was pretty drunk by then and very determined that I needed to stay with her.

I’ve had some interesting encounters with drunken strangers over the years 🙂  This one ended up the most bizarre of all.  An older businessman joined us in the bar.  He was staying in the hotel and they hit it off.  He seemed like a nice guy.  The very inebriated lady seemed determined to stay in my room, which would have been weird but, in the end, she decided she could stay in the gentleman’s room.  I had to walk with her there.  As soon as we arrived, the safari got a little too much like a nature documentary so I shielded my eyes as I backed out of the room as fast as possible!

If bizarre encounters with strangers aren’t your thing, there are other less adventurous things you can do in Shoreditch.  One of my favourite discoveries this trip was the Spitalfields Market.  Lots of choices at better prices than you normally find in London.

You can opt for a traditional English pub or go more locavore in a pretentious cocktail bar.  We tried to get into nightjar but you really need to make a reservation.  We did get into Happiness Forgets and the cocktails were excellent but it was uncomfortably hot.  Perhaps it’s a heritage building and you can’t install air conditioning…

You can also stay in Shoreditch and explore other parts of London.  As already noted, British cuisine has come a long way since I first encountered it.  What is funny is that London is the advance team in cultural affairs in almost all respects but, when it comes to food, it is tipping its hat to the Pacific Northwest.  I think it’s a combination of the hippie past, the affinity for nature and the lush local produce but the idea of getting creative with local ingredients has been part of the Pacific Northwest for a few decades.

Ironically the restaurant we went to in Fitzrovia is called Portland.  I don’t think the Brits realize they are eating Pacific Northwest style cuisine but it’s the formula I’ve known and loved most of my adult life – in season local produce identified by supplier, clever and creative combinations and great flavours.  I normally order European wine in Europe but they had a bottle of D2 from Washington state, which was delicious and seemed to match the menu 🙂

A more English experience, I also went to have a cocktail at the Connaught as it had been recommended by a London bartender.  It is an experience and certainly worth doing.  Just know that there will be no question you ARE in London when the bill comes so be ready for the sticker shock!  The most expensive drink of my life – now surpassing deciding to drink champagne (without first asking the price) at the legendary Victoria Falls Hotel while looking at the falls. Also worth it 🙂

While the British Empire might not have been a good idea, it does mean that London is

somerset house design biennale

incredible creativity and colour

agog in cultural treasures from all over the world.  In a 21st century acknowledgement that the world has changed, Somerset House initiated a biennale to celebrate global design and I just happened to be in London.  It was amazing and the next one isn’t until 2018 so there is plenty of time to plan for it.

My final stranger encounter this trip was one of my favourites.  I stayed in Earl’s Court when I got back from Riga as it’s on the tube line to Heathrow so made my exit faster.  Stayed at the Rockwell Hotel, a small hotel only a short walk from the station.  It’s very well priced for London.  It was Sunday night and nothing looked too interesting on the street so decided to have a mojito at the hotel bar and head to bed.  I wouldn’t recommend having a cocktail at the hotel as the bar is not really properly equipped to make them but it did lead to an interesting chat with my charming server.

posh west london

rockwell hotel ‘hood

She was from Vilnius!  I don’t think she gets too many customers who have just been there.  I expect many are not sure where Lithuania is so we had a lively chat about proper cocktails, life in London as a foreigner and the rise of the Baltics.  Yet more proof of the rewards of talking to strangers 😉

London is a multifaceted place and you can live all sorts of lives there from super posh to super gritty.  I like to mix it up and keep things fresh 😉

 

has everyone been watching jamie oliver?

Or Nigella?  My personal girl crush 🙂

This is definitely a way to prolong your vacation 😉  But I had some fun experiences in London so will attempt to share them… maybe a little late, but most things not of the moment…

I am hoping this post does not just represent some strange adventure in a parallel universe but an experience that could be repeated…

As noted earlier, I first arrived in the UK in 1989.  My memories of the food mostly involved trying to avoid the grease.  There was a lot of deep-frying – and not all that fat was fresh.  Accompanied by mushy peas and vegetables cooked to the point of torture (I think after that long in a pot you can be accused of crushing a carrot’s soul), it looked like a dream destination for a Weight Watchers commercial.

If, of course, you had a palate… and just said “no”.  On the very first trip, I did that a lot.  Of course, I got enough calories from shortbread and clotted cream I couldn’t exactly become a Weight Watchers spokesperson.  But I did develop an allergy to the stuff the English liked to trot out and suggest was food.

I wasn’t the only one!  And somewhere over the decades, gastropubs emerged, Jamie Oliver, Nigella Lawson and Gordon Ramsay became so famous that even someone who doesn’t know how to turn on a stove has likely heard of at least one of them.

I wouldn’t necessarily thank any of them personally because they are just famous and I am sure it was lots of people we have never heard of that actually changed British cuisine.  What came first – the chefs stepping away from the fryer – or the palates of the customers expanding and asking for more – or less in the case of recycled fatty acids.

I was just an observer.  I have been going to London regularly for over 20 years and I have started to enjoy eating there once in a while.  It has always seemed obscenely expensive though.  I live in this rarefied universe that combines a climate favorable to produce, a bevy of talented chefs at every price point and an adventurous gang of local customers anxious to eat out and spoiled for choice.

To impress me, you have to be great!  And I will care about the value.  So great will not be enough.

Because my city allows me to be such a spoiled brat I am tough on the rest of the world.  So, if I am impressed, it is something to be reckoned with.

And, this trip blew me away.  I’m not sure whether it’s London, me, or the global economy.  My guess would be a little of all three.  London cuisine has definitely improved over the years.  And the multicultural stew that London has become has provided the ingredients for better stew 😉 I am getting more adventurous in my wanderings and less prone to wander into a tourist trap.  And London is feeling the world’s pain given that so much of it involves financing the world’s ventures.  So a menu promising good value, rather than good champagne, is likely a much bigger sell than in the go-go days of the City’s early century heyday.

Poor investment bankers work for me 😉 I was astonished in that every meal that I had in London was above average.  That has never happened before.  And – even more impressive – none was wildly expensive.  I hung out mostly in the East.  Next trip that will be my stomping ground.  But I stayed at the Rockwell Hotel en route to and from Stockholm because it’s right on the Piccadilly Line so it was fantastically easy to get to and from Heathrow.  And the restaurant?  It was astonishing.  A fresh salad full of yummy veggies and fruits.  A salad in the UK?  How the world has changed.  I love it.  And the best fish and chips I have ever had!

http://www.therockwell.com/

Gordon Ramsay would be jealous 🙂  Of course, Gordon’s food isn’t all his reputation suggests.  I think he spends too much time these days mugging for the camera… but that’s a story for another time…

Just in case anyone is headed for London, here are the recent adventures in dining I would recommend checking out…

Pizarro/José

http://www.josepizarro.com/

Zucca

http://www.zuccalondon.com/

The Botanist

http://www.thebotanistonsloanesquare.com/

Anchor and Hope

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